A York Haven Scrapbook
North Eastern York County History In Preservation                          NeyChip
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Excerpts from:
York County Heritage
A York Haven Scrapbook
by Dr. Edward M. Miller.
Published in1979  to
benefit the York County
Library System.
"The York Haven Library Branch of the York County Library System is pleased to share
with you this scrapbook of mementos. From the steps of this second-oldest library in
York County, one can gaze at an impressive expanse of the Susquehanna River and
the northeastern shores of York County, from which come a rich heritage
that is too precious to be forgotten." 
                                                                                                                Dr. Edward M. Miller
   "On November 2, 1797, Governor Thomas Mifflin crossed the Susquehanna River below Conewago Falls, and stepped onto the shores of York County, now called York Haven, to celebrate the completion of the Conewago Canal. The one-mile canal was the first in PA and one of the earliest in the US. The canal had two locks at the southern end, 12 feet wide and 80 feet long. As the snow and sleet stung Governor Mifflin's face on that cold November Day. His flat boat rose nine feet to the cheers of 600 proud York Countians."

   "In the early 1800s, a dirt turnpike, sometimes called the York Haven Turnpike, was completed to encourage commerce and stagecoach traffic to Baltimore. The turnpike made it profitable for the large keel-boats carrying gain to be unloaded in York Haven for milling, crating and shipping. ...From 1800 to 1840, York Haven was one of the more productive York County communities. The Water's Hotel (Hotel Haven) filled its dining room and saloon with workers from a busy stone quarry, four flour mills (one was the largest in the state), copper and merchandise shops, a nail factory, a distillery, a hardware store, two large saw mills, and a dry goods store." 

  "By 1838 York and Baltimore were connected by rail ...and by 1850 past York Haven to connect Harrisburg and upstate. ...The bonanza era of loaded keel-boats and creaking Conestoga wagons for the York Haven Merchants was over."

  "The York Haven Paper Company purchased building, land and water rights from the Baltimore milling interests in 1885. ...Spurred by new workers interested in making paper, and wanting a responsive government, on December 1, 1892, the village became a Borough, and John Shure was the first burgess. By 1900, 824 people lived in York Haven."

  "The York Haven Water & Power Company was incorporated in 1895, acquired land and water rights from the York Haven Paper Company, began construction in 1901, went into operation in 1904... The power station depends on the Susquehanna River to turn the turbines. A main channel was dredged and a immense granite wall and dam were built to improve operations. A five-male lake in the river is formed by the dam and it is called Lake Frederic."

   "From 1904 to the late 1930's, the York Railway Company's electric streetcars, brought weekend visitors from York, Emigsville and Manchester to the York Haven Pythian Park to hear local bands, to the Susquehanna River area for fishing, swimming,and boating, and to the unique round building which was a skating rink (now the location of the library)."
This page is dedicated to Dr. Edward M Miller of York Haven, Pa.
Read about him here.
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to see more.